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Iterator, Enumerator and Yield Keyword

Note: The example code below is only used to demonstrate my point, by all means it’s not SOLID.

In Object Oriented Programming
Iterating is a process of repeating similar steps or functions.
Enumerating is an action of going through an entire collection of objects.

In C#
Iterator refers to set of functions to be executed on a collection.
For example:

Func<User, User> deactivate = (User u) =>
{
    u.IsActive = false;
    return u;
};

Enumerator refer to an object type that result from iterating through a collection.
For example:

IEnumerable<User> result = Users.Select(x => deactivate(x));

Complete code:

public class User
{
    public bool IsActive { get; set; }
}

public IEnumerable<User> DeactivateUsers()
{
    User[] Users = {
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true }
    };

    Func<User, User> deactivate = (User u) =>
    {
        u.IsActive = false;
        return u;
    };

    IEnumerable<User> result = Users.Select(x => deactivate(x));
    return result;
}

Yield Keyword
Yield keyword allow you to indicate that the code where it is being used is an iterator. The code must return a type of IEnumerable or IEnumerable<T>.

Continue from example above. We can write it different way, such as:

public IEnumerable<User> DeactivateUsers()
{
    User[] Users = {
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true }
    };

    List<User> result = new List<User>();

    foreach (var u in Users)
    {
        u.IsActive = false;
        result.Add(u);
    }

    return result;
}

Or another way, which utilize yield keyword to return Enumerator object for us.

public IEnumerable<User> DeactivateUsers()
{
    User[] Users = {
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true },
        new User { IsActive = true }
    };

    foreach (var u in Users)
    {
        u.IsActive = false;
        yield return u;
    }
}

References:
MSDN
Stackoverflow

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Posted by on May 10, 2019 in General

 

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Unit Test Internal Members

Applies to .Net application in Visual Studio 2010 and up.

Say I have C# project (call it QC project). In the project, I have class that has internal member(s) like this:

namespace QC
{
    public class PersonService
    {
        public bool PromotePerson(string userName)
        {
        }

        internal bool FindPerson(string userName)
        {
        }
    }
}

For unit test, I’d created separate project (call it QCTest project). Because internal members can only be accessed in same assembly, I won’t be able to invoke `QC.PersonService.FindPerson(string userName)` method from QCTest project.

To overcome this issue, in `AssemblyInfo.cs` of project being tested (in my case, QC project), simply add

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("QCTest")]

After rebuilding my solution, I am able to access `QC.PersonService.FindPerson(string userName)` in my QCTest project.

As an added bonus, if you use mock library like Moq or Rhino and try to mock internal members, you most likely need to add:

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("DynamicProxyGenAssembly2")]

What is `DynamicProxyGenAssembly2` ?

DynamicProxyGenAssembly2 is a temporary assembly built by mocking systems that use CastleProxy like Moq or NSubsitute. It is generated when the mock is needed and disposed of after the tests are finished.

Reference: https://stackoverflow.com/a/17179923

 
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Posted by on January 18, 2019 in General

 

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