What to Read this Week?

Integrating Cosmos DB with OData (Part 1)

Azure Cosmos DB is great, but what if you need expose it as OData standard, including the query in URI convention? Well, you integrate it with OData. Hassan covers the basic of Cosmos DB, what is it and how to set it up, and how to integrate it with OData.

40 Visual Studio Code Plugins I Have

One can never has enough Visual Studio Code plugins. Here’s another 40 for you.

Open Neural Network Exchange (ONNX)

Machine learning is on the rise and everyone develops their own standard. ONNX (read `onix`) is an open standard model for machine learning. This explains what is it in more details as well as where to get the pre-build ONNX models (model zoo).

Introduction to Big O Notation and Time Complexity (Data Structures & Algorithms #7)

CSDojo explains Big O Notation in a simple, easy to understand way and how time and space complexity are calculated. There are some maths involved, but they are pretty basic.

C# Data Structures

And along with Big O Notation, these articles go over the data structures that are available in C#. Learning and knowing when to use these data structures are important in building the fast algorithm.
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Fair Distribution Algorithm

Given 5 boxes with different weight [24, 27, 17, 15, 17], distribute the weight as even as possible among 3 trucks of the same size. The trucks can fit unlimited number of boxes. The weight of the boxes can’t be transferred, for example moveĀ 4 from box 1 (originally weight 24) and transfer to box 2.

What if we have more boxes with different weight, let’s say 6 boxes with weight of [1, 2, 17, 21, 7, 6].

What if the number of truck change to 5 trucks?

What’s the most effective algorithm to distribute the boxes evenly (in weight) within all the trucks?

Bubble Sort Algorithm

A simple sorting algorithm that works by repeatedly stepping through the list to be sorted, comparing each pair of adjacent items and swapping them if they are in the wrong order. The pass through the list is repeated until no swaps are needed, which indicates that the list is sorted.

bubble-sort-algorithm

Reference: Wikipedia

Heapsort Algorithm

A comparison-based sorting algorithm, it divides its input into a sorted and an unsorted region, and it iteratively shrinks the unsorted region by extracting the smallest element and moving that to the sorted region.
Larger nodes don’t stay below smaller node parents. They are swapped with parents, and then recursively checked if another swap is needed, to keep larger numbers above smaller numbers on the heap binary tree.

heapsort-algorithm

Reference: Wikipedia

QuickSort Algorithm

Quicksort is a divide and conquer algorithm. Quicksort first divides a large array into two smaller sub-arrays: the low elements and the high elements. Quicksort can then recursively sort the sub-arrays.

The steps are:

  1. Pick an element, called a pivot, from the array.
  2. Reorder the array so that all elements with values less than the pivot come before the pivot, while all elements with values greater than the pivot come after it (equal values can go either way). After this partitioning, the pivot is in its final position. This is called thepartition operation.
  3. Recursively apply the above steps to the sub-array of elements with smaller values and separately to the sub-array of elements with greater values.

quicksort-algorithm

Reference: Wikipedia

Selection Sort Algorithm

The algorithm divides the input list into two parts: the sublist of items already sorted, which is built up from left to right at the front (left) of the list, and the sublist of items remaining to be sorted that occupy the rest of the list. Initially, the sorted sublist is empty and the unsorted sublist is the entire input list. The algorithm proceeds by finding the smallest element in the unsorted sublist, exchanging it with the leftmost unsorted element (putting it in sorted order), and moving the sublist boundaries one element to the right.

selection-sort-algorithm

Reference: Wikipedia

Insertion Sort Algorithm

Insertion sort iterates, consuming one input element each repetition, and growing a sorted output list. Each iteration, insertion sort removes one element from the input data, finds the location it belongs within the sorted list, and inserts it there. It repeats until no input elements remain.

insertion-sort-algorithm

Reference: Wikipedia